We belong here: Christina's Story

We belong here: Christina's Story

When Christina Haswood swore into the Kansas Legislature as the youngest member and the second Native American to serve in its history, she proudly wore the traditional clothing and jewelry of the Diné. “I wanted to honor my ancestors and my family for all the sacrifices they made for me to be here.”

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Demystifying Public Policy & Political Leadership: Tiffaney's Story

When Tiffaney was an undergrad at California State University San Marcos, she wasn’t thinking about political leadership. Instead, she was focused on obtaining a bachelor's degree in Social Science and Communications. That changed when the CSUSM Women's Center ran a campus campaign to inspire women to run for office.

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Pay us what we deserve: Pass the Paycheck Fairness Act

Pay us what we deserve: Pass the Paycheck Fairness Act

This summary of the Paycheck Fairness Act was authored by the National Partnership for Women & Families. Read the original post. The landmark Equal Pay Act of 1963 made it illegal for employers to pay unequal wages to men and women who perform substantially equal work. The Equal Pay Act and the civil rights laws that followed helped change the workplace and began to combat wage inequality, but these laws have not closed the persistent gap between women’s and men’s wages.

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Recommended reads for #AAPIHeritageMonth

Recommended reads for #AAPIHeritageMonth

This #AAPI Heritage Month, we challenge you to only read books written by AAPI authors. Check out these books that recount lived experiences and highlight stories of what it's like to grow up in America. Support your local AAPI-owned book stores by purchasing your books here

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Black Mothers' Lives Matter: Black Maternal Health Momnibus Act of 2021

Black Mothers' Lives Matter: Black Maternal Health Momnibus Act 2021

Republished from The Black Maternal Health Caucus | View original post In the richest nation on earth, moms are dying at the highest rate in the developed world – and the rate is rising. For as dire as the situation is for all women and birthing people, the crisis is most severe for Black moms, who are dying at 3 to 4 times the rate of their white counterparts. Native Americans are more than twice as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes. One study found that in New York City, Hispanic birthing people experienced severe maternal morbidity at 1.8 times the rate of non-Hispanic white birthing people. Other research has shown that Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) have higher rates of maternal mortality during hospitalization for delivery, even after accounting for other factors that affect outcomes.

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